National Landscape Architecture Month and Denver’s Public Spaces

National Landscape Architecture Month
Denver’s 6th Avenue Parkway

April is National Landscape Architecture Month

National Landscape Architecture Month is an opportunity to celebrate and learn about many of the historic resources in the National Register of Historic Places and the Colorado State Register of Historic Properties. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America’s historic and archaeological resources, and is the official list of the Nation’s historic places worthy of preservation. The Colorado State Register of Historic Properties is a listing of the state’s significant cultural resources worthy of preservation for the future education and enjoyment of Colorado’s residents and visitors. Continue reading “National Landscape Architecture Month and Denver’s Public Spaces”

Azalia Smith Hackley—Musical Prodigy and Pioneering Journalist

Azalia Smith Hackley, The Broad Ax [Salt Lake City, UT], Chronicling America, http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024055/1910-11-12/ed-1/seq-1/
Azalia Smith Hackley, The Broad Ax Salt Lake City, UT, Chronicling America.
In honor of Women’s History Month, we’re highlighting Emma Azalia Smith Hackley, a former resident of Denver and co-editor of the newspaper the Statesman. The Statesman, which later became The Denver Star, will be the first of 18 titles History Colorado is digitizing to add to the Library of Congress Chronicling America database. If you’d like to learn more about History Colorado’s participation in the National Digital Newspaper Program, please follow this link. Continue reading “Azalia Smith Hackley—Musical Prodigy and Pioneering Journalist”

National NAGPRA Review Committee 62nd Meeting

Forum and Roundtable March 14.

History Colorado was honored to host the 62nd National Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) Review Committee meetings on March 15 and 16. The meetings were preceded by a public roundtable and open forum that I organized around the topics of consultation challenges and successes. Continue reading “National NAGPRA Review Committee 62nd Meeting”

In Starkville, a Small Certified Local Government with Big Hopes

Coal miners descend into the mine at Starkville, around 1900.
Coal miners descend into the mine at Starkville, around 1900.

Sitting deep in southern Colorado, the former mining town of Starkville—like so many other mining communities—has seen its share of booms and busts. Although the town is far smaller than it was during its once-lively and industrious mining period, the people of Starkville see their past as something worth preserving. They recently formed a CLG—a Certified Local Government—to help them preserve the town’s remaining historic buildings. Continue reading “In Starkville, a Small Certified Local Government with Big Hopes”

Women’s History Embodied in Our Historic Resources

The National Register of Historic Places and Colorado State Register of Historic Properties are tools that recognize National Women’s History Month, celebrated in March. The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation’s historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America’s historic and archeological resources. The Colorado State Register of Historic Properties is a listing of the state’s significant cultural resources worthy of preservation for the future education and enjoyment of Colorado’s residents and visitors. 

Cedar Mesa Community Club, 15637 Peach Road, Cedaredge, Delta County, listed in the State Register in 2016

Cedar Mesa Community Club
Cedar Mesa Community Club

The Cedar Mesa Community Club formed in 1908 as a way for the women of this relatively isolated agricultural community to meet and provide support to one another and their neighbors. Descendants and family members (mothers, daughters, sisters, etc.) have been club members as well. By 1949 the club had raised enough funds to build their own clubhouse on former orchard land donated by one of its members and her husband. The building was in large part constructed by the members’ husbands, and the members used scrap lumber to build furniture. The club has continuously held many social activities and community events at the single-room clubhouse ever since. Continue reading “Women’s History Embodied in Our Historic Resources”