PrideFest: A History of Denver’s Gay Pride Celebration

 

The Gay and Lesbian Community Center of Colorado (today The Center) was founded in 1976. The first salaried employee, Phil Nash, began as a volunteer before serving as coordinator from 1977 to 1980. Nash shot this photography of Denver’s 1981 parade.

Although no designated landmark pays tribute to Denver’s gay and lesbian history, the annual PrideFest celebration has anchored the community since June 1974. The event’s evolution in Denver reflects social and political changes affecting the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) community through the decades. Not only does PrideFest serve as a time for members and friends of the GLBT community to connect, have fun, demonstrate gay pride, and show support for gay rights; it also commemorates a pivotal moment in gay rights history, the Stonewall Riots. Continue reading “PrideFest: A History of Denver’s Gay Pride Celebration”

Reel News: Yesterday’s News Today — “Some Freak Bills”

Heaven forfend! Women on bicycles! In bloomers! (Illustration from Puck, June 19, 1895, Library of Congress) (https://www.loc.gov/resource/cph.3b49127/)

“A bill was presented to the legislature of one of the eastern states making it a criminal offense for women to wear bloomers for bicycle riding. Some years ago there was a hue and cry because women wore Mother Hubbard dresses on the streets. They could wear Mother Hubbard cloaks or jackets, but not dresses, and there was a great deal of wonderment at the difference. Continue reading “Reel News: Yesterday’s News Today — “Some Freak Bills””

NHPRC “Colorado 20th-Century Photograph Collections Project” Nearly Complete

Intern Erica San Soucie with a mammoth glass negative from the Aultman Studio collection
Intern Erica San Soucie with a mammoth glass negative from the Aultman Studio collection

This month, the Photography Department wraps up a two-year project to make four of its most significant photography collections available to the public. By the end of June, researchers will be able to browse through online collection guides to and digital images from the Aultman Studio, Fred Payne Clatworthy, David DeHarport, and Winter Prather collections. The project has been generously supported by an Access to Historical Records grant from the National Historic Records and Publications Committee (NHPRC). Continue reading “NHPRC “Colorado 20th-Century Photograph Collections Project” Nearly Complete”

Reel News: Yesterday’s News Today — “Fashions in Montana”

“Fashion of the 19th Century” in the Young Ladies Journal, January 1888 (History Colorado)
“Fashion of the 19th Century” in the Young Ladies Journal, January 1888 (History Colorado)

“The editor of the Montana Schreecher attended a May-day ball and, for the first time in his life, attempted a description of the costumes for the benefit and gratification of his lady readers. We copy several of his gratifying descriptions:

“Miss Sally McSniffin was rigged out as pretty as a red and green wagon with two spring seats, and made more mashes than a few. She had on a blue dress with a flap at the side, and a puffy something or other on the other side.

“Miss Susie Sharp wore an en train rig, and could have knocked Mrs. Langtry silly when it came to good looks. Her hair was en curl and her face en powder. She had sixteen rings on one finger and bracelets clean to her elbow.

“Little Birdie Bloom was ‘the daintiest darling of all,’ in white toggery of some sort, looped up in spots. She wore hand-painted gloves and slippers, and passymentry jewelry; also the curls that have been on exhibition in the window of our fashionable hair-dresser for the past week.

“Miss Dorritty reminded one of a double rainbow and was the belle of the occasion. It’s a cold day when Lizzie Ann Dorritty gets left at a ball, and she was at her best last night. She is immensely popular at the Fifth Avenue hotel, where she has been head cook for the past year. She was as sweet last night as one of her own apple dumplings.—Tid Bits.”

Bent County Register (Lamar, Colo.), July 2, 1887

By Wheel, Burro, and Rail: Young Fred Payne Clatworthy’s Adventures in the West

A studio portrait of Fred Payne Clatworthy with a bicycle, 1897.
A studio portrait of Fred Payne Clatworthy with a bicycle, 1897; Accession number: 99.164.2211.

Travel was integral to Estes Park photographer Fred Payne Clatworthy’s life and work. During the early 20th century, transit companies sponsored Clatworthy’s travel to locations near and far. Railroads like the Great Northern and Southern Pacific sent Clatworthy to shoot promotional images in Glacier National Park and the western coast of Mexico in the 1920s, while later in the decade Clatworthy ventured further afield when the Matson Navigation and Union Steamship Companies sent him to Hawaii, New Zealand and Tahiti. Many of these trips yielded his most well-known images: full color autochromes that appeared in National Geographic magazine between 1923 and 1934. Continue reading “By Wheel, Burro, and Rail: Young Fred Payne Clatworthy’s Adventures in the West”