Tabor Bed and Dresser

In search of gold, Horace Tabor and his first wife, Augusta, settled in Denver in 1859. After a number of years in Oro City (an early mining town near Leadville, now abandoned), the couple moved to Leadville in 1877. A year later, Horace struck it rich—in silver, not gold. With his new wealth, he established newspapers, a bank and the Tabor Opera House in Leadville and the Tabor Grand Opera House and Tabor Block in Denver. He also bought the Matchless mine in Leadville (1879), earning for a time $2,000 a day from its high-quality silver. Continue reading “Tabor Bed and Dresser”

Crossing the Line: Solemn Mysteries of the Ancient Order of the Deep

Melissa_DeBie
Melissa de Bie, Director of Collections Management & Registration at History Colorado

Several weeks ago, I was giving a behind-the-scenes tour and randomly opening some of our map cabinets, when I spotted this certificate. The imagery and some of the verbiage caught my interest, and I made a mental note to return to it. What I found was an interesting little bit of maritime history that is now part of the History Colorado Collection.

Continue reading “Crossing the Line: Solemn Mysteries of the Ancient Order of the Deep”

A Project for the Present

James Peterson, Assistant Curator for Artifacts at History Colorado
James Peterson, Assistant Curator for Artifacts at History Colorado

As part of the History Colorado curatorial staff, one of my responsibilities is to help identify objects that reflect the history of our state, both past and present. A few years back while searching for artifacts that would help tell the story of the struggles of Baca County settlers during the Dust Bowl, I discovered we had very little physical evidence of this particular community’s experience. In fact, I couldn’t find one object in the History Colorado collection specific to an individual who personally lived through that era in Baca County. This discovery made me think about how we collect for the future and how important it is that we be inclusive of all social strata. I began to consider the current experience of homeless individuals and families in our state. Continue reading “A Project for the Present”

Reading Photographs and Discovering Early Photos of Salida’s FIBark Race

Happy American Archives Month! This month we’ve been sharing some behind-the-scenes stories about the work we do in History Colorado’s photograph archives. Check out our last blog post about daguerreotypes here!

Emily Moazami, Photo Archivist & Associate Curator of Photography
Emily Moazami, Photo Archivist & Associate Curator of Photography

We recently made an exciting discovery in our collection: we found photographs of Salida’s first annual boat race, now known as FIBArk (First in Boating the Arkansas).  We’re going to show you how we made this discovery by “reading” the photograph and how you can improve your visual literacy skills, too. Continue reading “Reading Photographs and Discovering Early Photos of Salida’s FIBark Race”

Mad Hatters and the Anatomy of a Daguerreotype

Moazami_dag
Emily Moazami, Photo Archivist & Associate Curator of Photography at History Colorado

Did you know that October is American Archives Month? To celebrate, we’ll be sharing some behind-the-scenes stories from our Photograph Collection and highlighting some of the work we do to preserve, organize, describe and provide access to the images in our collection. This summer our staff, interns and volunteers have been been digitizing, researching and cataloging our Early Photography collection: 600 daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes.  Continue reading “Mad Hatters and the Anatomy of a Daguerreotype”