Keys to Historic Preservation: Estes Park’s Baldpate Inn

Imagine that your grandfather was a San Francisco ferryboat captain who transported the notorious gangster Al Capone to Alcatraz Island, and that, as a memento of the occasion, he quietly pocketed the key to Capone’s handcuffs. Now imagine that this small key—this tiny piece of history—stayed in your family for a few generations, until one day you got the idea that perhaps it should be rescued from your sock drawer and sent to a museum somewhere. But where should it go? Is there a museum for keys?

As a matter of fact, there is. And it’s in a mountainside inn near Rocky Mountain National Park.

Located near Estes Park and Rocky Mountain National Park, the Baldpate Inn is one of thousands of locations that have benefited from History Colorado State Historical Fund Grants. (Photo courtesy of the Baldpate Inn.)

Continue reading “Keys to Historic Preservation: Estes Park’s Baldpate Inn”

Reel News: Yesterday’s News Today — “Some Freak Bills”

Heaven forfend! Women on bicycles! In bloomers! (Illustration from Puck, June 19, 1895, Library of Congress) (https://www.loc.gov/resource/cph.3b49127/)

“A bill was presented to the legislature of one of the eastern states making it a criminal offense for women to wear bloomers for bicycle riding. Some years ago there was a hue and cry because women wore Mother Hubbard dresses on the streets. They could wear Mother Hubbard cloaks or jackets, but not dresses, and there was a great deal of wonderment at the difference. Continue reading “Reel News: Yesterday’s News Today — “Some Freak Bills””

Auto Record-Setter and Murderer’s Friend: Frank P. Loveland

Frank P. Loveland on the rocky summit of Mount Falcon. Denver Post, June 6, 1910.

The first automobile appeared in Louisville, Colorado in 1904. The year the first Denver resident bought a car is not known. But, the first trip by automobile from Morrison to the top of Mount Falcon, an elevation change of over 2,000 feet, took place in 1910.

The man who at age twenty-four accomplished this feat was Francis Percy “Frank” Loveland. He was a member of the social elite and of a prominent Colorado pioneer family (hint: Loveland Pass). Born in Denver on June 11, 1885, Frank attended East High School which was on Stout Street between 19th and 20th at the time. His parents sent him to Yale University, where he graduated in 1908. Continue reading “Auto Record-Setter and Murderer’s Friend: Frank P. Loveland”

NHPRC “Colorado 20th-Century Photograph Collections Project” Nearly Complete

Intern Erica San Soucie with a mammoth glass negative from the Aultman Studio collection
Intern Erica San Soucie with a mammoth glass negative from the Aultman Studio collection

This month, the Photography Department wraps up a two-year project to make four of its most significant photography collections available to the public. By the end of June, researchers will be able to browse through online collection guides to and digital images from the Aultman Studio, Fred Payne Clatworthy, David DeHarport, and Winter Prather collections. The project has been generously supported by an Access to Historical Records grant from the National Historic Records and Publications Committee (NHPRC). Continue reading “NHPRC “Colorado 20th-Century Photograph Collections Project” Nearly Complete”

Recognizing a historic Colorado farm during National Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month

National Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month

The National Register of Historic Places and Colorado State Register of Historic Properties are tools that recognize National Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month, celebrated in May. The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation’s historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America’s historic and archaeological resources. The Colorado State Register of Historic Properties is a listing of the state’s significant cultural resources worthy of preservation for the future education and enjoyment of Colorado’s residents and visitors. Properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places are automatically placed in the Colorado State Register. They may also be nominated separately to the Colorado State Register without inclusion in the National Register. Continue reading “Recognizing a historic Colorado farm during National Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month”