Buffalo Bill’s Mortician: Joseph E. Bona

Buffalo Bill
Buffalo Bill funeral notice. Kyle Hier collection.

Most Westerners know about frontiersman William F. Cody—Buffalo Bill—known for his life as a buffalo hunter, Army scout, Pony Express rider, and Wild-West-show creator. His death holds a certain fascination for people, and this year, 2017, is the 100-year anniversary of his death.

Considerable attention has been paid to the feud between Denver and Cody, Wyoming over the right to his burial location. In fact, the Buffalo Bill Museum, located next to his gravesite on Lookout Mountain just west of Denver, has a special exhibit entitled “A Better Place Could Hardly Have Been Chosen” which commemorates his death and controversial burial.

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National Landscape Architecture Month and Denver’s Public Spaces

National Landscape Architecture Month
Denver’s 6th Avenue Parkway

April is National Landscape Architecture Month

National Landscape Architecture Month is an opportunity to celebrate and learn about many of the historic resources in the National Register of Historic Places and the Colorado State Register of Historic Properties. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America’s historic and archaeological resources, and is the official list of the Nation’s historic places worthy of preservation. The Colorado State Register of Historic Properties is a listing of the state’s significant cultural resources worthy of preservation for the future education and enjoyment of Colorado’s residents and visitors. Continue reading “National Landscape Architecture Month and Denver’s Public Spaces”

PART V — 888 LOGAN STREET: HOME TO THE PROMINENT

Courtesy LIV Sotheby's International Realty
888 Logan Street today. Photo courtesy LIV Sotheby’s International Realty.

After four fascinating segments about the history of Denver’s 888 Logan Street, Judith Stalnaker brings her story to a close as we explore three more residents and the influence still felt today of 888 Logan Street’s early residents…


My five-month-long search to see if famous people lived at 888 Logan Street has been rewarding and exciting.  I started with a name from a list, knowing nothing about the person behind the name. Imagine how thrilling it was when, for the name “Joseph E. Bona,” I found an old newspaper article entitled “Buffalo Bill’s Mortician, J.E. Bona, Dies at 90.” Or the delight when I found the name “Hannah Levy” belonged to the woman who owned Fashion Bar (where I used to shop). Or when Lewis Dymond turned out to have been the President of Frontier Airlines. Continue reading “PART V — 888 LOGAN STREET: HOME TO THE PROMINENT”

PART IV — 888 LOGAN STREET: HOME TO THE PROMINENT

North face of 888 Logan St. Mosaic tile was replaced by stucco in 1999.
North face of 888 Logan Street. Mosaic tile was replaced by stucco in 1999.

Last week, we learned about a psychiatrist, a lawyer, an oil man, and an industrialist who all lived at 888 Logan Street, an apartment building in Denver’s Capitol Hill neighborhood that was once said to be, “the most luxurious apartment house ever built in Denver.” 

Constructed in 1959, the building is of midcentury modern design, a style created in the 1950s and portions of the preceding and following decades. The 888 Logan Street building exemplifies midcentury modern style with its clean, unadorned lines and large expanses of glass. Continue reading “PART IV — 888 LOGAN STREET: HOME TO THE PROMINENT”

Fall in Bloom: History and Art at the Denver Botanic Gardens

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Waring House with a Chihuly glass sculpture
Last month I experienced plants, flowers and art in a way I had never before at this stunning oasis in Denver. Its name? The Denver Botanic Gardens.
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Ting in the Chinese Garden
In this enchanting place, everything is a work of art. Every garden, carefully designed, every painting and sculpture on display, every plant they nourish — each is a work of art. It’s obvious that tons of thought and love has been poured into each masterpiece.

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