Reel News: Yesterday’s News Today—“Cyclone in a Restaurant”

1_Headline_Herald Democrat [Leadvile, CO]_November 15, 1895
Headline, Herald Democrat (Leadville), November 15, 1895. History Colorado microfilm newspaper collection and Colorado State Library, Colorado Historic Newspaper Collection (https://goo.gl/OZ7GgR)
“Sugar bowls, catsup bottles, vinegar cruets, mustard pots, pork and beans, odds and ends of uneaten pie, went flying through the air at Escher’s State street restaurant night before last, while the after-midnight diners ducked their heads under the tables to escape the cyclone of dishes and food. Continue reading “Reel News: Yesterday’s News Today—“Cyclone in a Restaurant””

The First Passenger Train Travels through the Royal Gorge this Week in Colorado History

The iconic Royal Gorge Bridge Scan # 10029520
The iconic Royal Gorge Bridge
Scan # 10029520

Today, travel experiences are marked by long lines at airports and trying to remember if you removed all the liquids in your bag over three ounces. At the same time, you have to take off your shoes and belt and remove change and metal from your pockets — all before the travelers behind you grumble and glare because you’re holding up the line. It makes you yearn for the days when traveling was something different entirely. Your suitcase wasn’t filled with wrinkle-free dresses and tennis shoes, but your finest wardrobe and jewels that you wore, back when people “dressed” for dinner aboard elegant dining cars during a multi-day sojourn aboard a train. Back then, train travel wasn’t necessarily about your final destination, it was about the people, sites, socializing and scenery along the way. Continue reading “The First Passenger Train Travels through the Royal Gorge this Week in Colorado History”

Baby Doe Tabor: the Matchless Girl’s Wedding Dress

kathryn_klein
Kathryn Klein, Curator of Culture and Community at History Colorado

Growing up in Denver, I knew Leadville as a destination for our family to take out-of-town relatives who came to visit Colorado. I still have fond memories of eating ice cream cones on summer days while walking with my cousin through the streets of the Old West. The rocky mountains of Colorado instilled a deep sense of wildness, strength and independence in my 12-year-old mind in the early 1970s. My cousin Mark, from Illinois, was exactly the same age as me, and if I’d looked him in the eye while we ate our ice cream in the middle of Leadville, I’d have considered us equal in every way. How little did I know how hard-fought my attitude came from a history of so many women before me. And in the West were a number of women whose stories tell us the truth about privilege, hardship and endurance. Continue reading “Baby Doe Tabor: the Matchless Girl’s Wedding Dress”