NHPRC “Colorado 20th-Century Photograph Collections Project” Nearly Complete

Intern Erica San Soucie with a mammoth glass negative from the Aultman Studio collection
Intern Erica San Soucie with a mammoth glass negative from the Aultman Studio collection

This month, the Photography Department wraps up a two-year project to make four of its most significant photography collections available to the public. By the end of June, researchers will be able to browse through online collection guides to and digital images from the Aultman Studio, Fred Payne Clatworthy, David DeHarport, and Winter Prather collections. The project has been generously supported by an Access to Historical Records grant from the National Historic Records and Publications Committee (NHPRC). Continue reading “NHPRC “Colorado 20th-Century Photograph Collections Project” Nearly Complete”

By Wheel, Burro, and Rail: Young Fred Payne Clatworthy’s Adventures in the West

A studio portrait of Fred Payne Clatworthy with a bicycle, 1897.
A studio portrait of Fred Payne Clatworthy with a bicycle, 1897; Accession number: 99.164.2211.

Travel was integral to Estes Park photographer Fred Payne Clatworthy’s life and work. During the early 20th century, transit companies sponsored Clatworthy’s travel to locations near and far. Railroads like the Great Northern and Southern Pacific sent Clatworthy to shoot promotional images in Glacier National Park and the western coast of Mexico in the 1920s, while later in the decade Clatworthy ventured further afield when the Matson Navigation and Union Steamship Companies sent him to Hawaii, New Zealand and Tahiti. Many of these trips yielded his most well-known images: full color autochromes that appeared in National Geographic magazine between 1923 and 1934. Continue reading “By Wheel, Burro, and Rail: Young Fred Payne Clatworthy’s Adventures in the West”

Introducing the Fred Payne Clatworthy Collection

Portrait of Clatworthy
Portrait of Clatworthy, circa 1925, Accession number: 99.164.30

With the Aultman Studio collection finished, I’m happy to announce that we’ve begun work on the Fred Payne Clatworthy collection, the final set of material up for processing under our NHPRC 20th Century Photograph Collections Grant Project. The collection features the beautiful work of Frederick Payne Clatworthy, a photographer internationally recognized for his mastery of the autochrome (a rare, early form of color photography). Continue reading “Introducing the Fred Payne Clatworthy Collection”

Oliver Aultman’s Colorado River Adventure

Undine boat on the Colorado River
The Undine on the Colorado River, Utah, 1901. Accession number: 2001.41

Oliver Aultman, head of Colorado’s longest running photography studio, was not known for his sense of adventure. In the various biographical profiles I’ve read about Aultman while processing the Aultman Studio collection at History Colorado, he is described as a mild-mannered man who stayed out of politics, rarely took a drink, and preferred shooting photographs in the controlled atmosphere of his studio to the raucous streets of turn-of-the-century Trinidad, Colorado.1 Even Aultman’s son, Glenn, stated that his father’s penchant for photography rarely extended beyond the studio.2 Yet to call Aultman strictly a studio photographer would be an oversimplification of Aultman’s life and work. A huge case in point is Aultman’s little-documented adventure on the Green and Colorado Rivers in 1901. Continue reading “Oliver Aultman’s Colorado River Adventure”

A Little Background in the Warehouse…Literally

A couple weeks ago the Pueblo Move Project crew got to talking about our favorite pieces that we’ve found in the last few months since starting the project. There have been some incredible artifacts, including General William Palmer’s roll-top desk, David Moffat’s music box imported from France in 1936 (inside there are a series of bells that are periodically struck with tiny bee-shaped mallets while the music plays—well, presumably anyway), and a teeny-tiny cannon used for Fourth of July salutes from 1861 to 1876. Continue reading “A Little Background in the Warehouse…Literally”