This Week in Colorado History: The Colorado Avalanche Won Their First (and Second!) Stanley Cup

​Promotional Avalanche poster from their inaugural season.
​Promotional Avalanche poster from their inaugural season.

Whoever said that events had to occur a long time ago to be considered historical, clearly isn’t a sports fan. This week marks the 19th and 14th Anniversary of the Colorado Avalanche’s two Stanley Cups (and certainly not their last, in this devoted fan’s estimation). Continue reading “This Week in Colorado History: The Colorado Avalanche Won Their First (and Second!) Stanley Cup”

This week in Colorado History: Union Station Opens

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​Architectural drawing of the original construction. Scan # 30002809

Arriving in Denver during the 1860s, travelers would be greeted by a landscape that was vastly different than the scene that Denver would become. Denver was once described as a dry and barren destination, but with the rapid growth of the railroad, the city quickly became a major hub in Colorado. In order to accommodate this expansion Denver needed a central complex to transfer passengers and freight between competing railroads. The solution to this problem was the construction of one major building: Union Station. Continue reading “This week in Colorado History: Union Station Opens”

Symbol of the American West, Kit Carson, Died 147 Years Ago This Week in Colorado History

​Portrait of Kit Carson. Scan # 10037181; Carte de Visite Collection
​Portrait of Kit Carson. Scan # 10037181; Carte de Visite Collection

With the final words of “Doctor, comrade, adios!” the legendary Kit Carson died 147 years ago this week on May 23 in Fort Lyon, Colorado. Born Christopher “Kit” Carson on Christmas Eve of 1809 in Madison County, Kentucky, Carson became world famous—some might say infamous—as a trapper, scout, Indian agent and soldier, and as a symbol of the American West. Continue reading “Symbol of the American West, Kit Carson, Died 147 Years Ago This Week in Colorado History”

This Week in Colorado History – Denver Named Host City for 1976 Winter Olympics

Some of the events, like figure skating and ice hockey, were to be held at the Colosseum and DU.
Some of the events, like figure skating and ice hockey, were to be held at the Colosseum and DU.

“We meet again in Denver in 1976” read across the stadium board at the closing of the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan. But the world would not convene in Denver. Dorothy Hamill would skate her way to Olympic gold in Innsbruck, Austria instead. And Denver becomes the first, and only, city to ever win the bid to host the games and then reject them. Continue reading “This Week in Colorado History – Denver Named Host City for 1976 Winter Olympics”

This Week in Colorado History – Colorado Mountain Club is Founded

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CMC posing near the summit of Longs Peak in 1914. From the George Harvey, Jr. photograph albums (Ph.00094)

Today the mountains of Colorado are continuously flooded with people flocking to enjoy the bountiful trails. But imagine what it was like for the mountaineers at the turn of the century. Bulky wool clothing, heavy equipment and blisters all were part of the journey. These mountaineers were true adventurers who created what became the Colorado Mountain Club (CMC). Continue reading “This Week in Colorado History – Colorado Mountain Club is Founded”