Working on New Exhibits at The Ute Indian Museum in Montrose

Beaded Moccasins
Beaded Moccasins

While the construction to expand the Ute Indian Museum in Montrose is moving along nicely, the exhibit team at History Colorado is busy planning the new exhibits to be installed there. One of the most exciting parts of exhibit development is selection of the artifacts to support the stories of the Ute people that we will tell. Continue reading “Working on New Exhibits at The Ute Indian Museum in Montrose”

Ute Tribal Paths – A History Colorado Online Exhibit and Digital Badge

Ute online titleHistory Colorado is very excited to share  “Ute Tribal Paths”, a free online exhibit and digital badge on Ute Indian history, traditions and contemporary lives.

Click on the link to learn the story of Colorado’s longest continuous residents and explore:

  • Maps of the traditional Ute territories and today’s three Ute reservations
  • Video of Ute elder Alden Naranjo telling the story of the Bear Dance
  • Biographies of Ute leaders, including Ignacio, Buckskin Charlie and Ouray.
  • Photos of modern life on the three Ute reservations in Colorado in Utah.
  • Images of Ute clothing and artwork that will be featured in the new Ute Indian Museum exhibits.

In order to earn a digital badge, you’ll need to put historic events in the right places on a timeline and match traditional Ute activities to the season of the year. Continue reading “Ute Tribal Paths – A History Colorado Online Exhibit and Digital Badge”

The Ute Indian Museum: Expanding to Share the Stories of Ute People from the Past and Present

chipeta_graveThe Ute Indian Museum is being designed in consultation with three Ute tribes – Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, Southern Ute Indian Tribe, and the Ute Indian Tribe of Uintah and Ouray Reservation.
Continue reading “The Ute Indian Museum: Expanding to Share the Stories of Ute People from the Past and Present”

Behind the Scenes: Ute Collections Review

Z0020436Ute Coll RevHistory Colorado has extensive holdings of Ute artifacts—clothing, headdresses, baskets, beadwork, cradleboards, bows and arrows, ceramics and photographs—the bulk of the materials made in the late 1800s and early 1900s. In the collection are items that once belonged to Ute leaders, artifacts that show the expert workmanship of Ute craftspeople, and objects used in everyday life. Together, these remarkable materials help us interpret the history of Colorado’s remaining resident tribes: the Southern Ute Indian Tribe and the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, along with their sister tribe, the Ute Indian Tribe on the Uintah and Ouray Reservation in Utah. Continue reading “Behind the Scenes: Ute Collections Review”