Reel News: Yesterday’s News Today – “Perils of Paper Bags as Bustles”

A multitude of bustles, Godey's Fashions for February 1874, History Colorado
A multitude of bustles, Godey’s Fashions for February 1874, History Colorado

“There is a woman in Gunnison who has learned a lesson that will last her a lifetime. She has been for years wearing these paper bags, such as the grocers use, for bustles. The paper is stiff and sticks out splendidly, and makes the dress look well. Last Sunday morning while she was dressing, her young son got in the room and blew the paper bag full of wind and tied a string around the mouth of it and left it in a chair. The good lady took it and tied it on and dressed herself for church. She bribed her husband to go to church with her, though he was a soft Bob Ingersoll christian. As they went down the aisle the minister was reading a hymn about “Sounding the Loud Hosanna” and the lady went into the pew first and sat down while her husband was putting his hat on the floor. There was a report like distant thunder. You have heard how those confounded paper bags explode when boys blow them up and crush them between their hands. Continue reading “Reel News: Yesterday’s News Today – “Perils of Paper Bags as Bustles””

Buffalo Bill’s Mortician: Joseph E. Bona

Buffalo Bill
Buffalo Bill funeral notice. Kyle Hier collection.

Most Westerners know about frontiersman William F. Cody—Buffalo Bill—known for his life as a buffalo hunter, Army scout, Pony Express rider, and Wild-West-show creator. His death holds a certain fascination for people, and this year, 2017, is the 100-year anniversary of his death.

Considerable attention has been paid to the feud between Denver and Cody, Wyoming over the right to his burial location. In fact, the Buffalo Bill Museum, located next to his gravesite on Lookout Mountain just west of Denver, has a special exhibit entitled “A Better Place Could Hardly Have Been Chosen” which commemorates his death and controversial burial.

Continue reading “Buffalo Bill’s Mortician: Joseph E. Bona”

Reel News: Yesterday’s News Today—“Cyclone in a Restaurant”

1_Headline_Herald Democrat [Leadvile, CO]_November 15, 1895
Headline, Herald Democrat (Leadville), November 15, 1895. History Colorado microfilm newspaper collection and Colorado State Library, Colorado Historic Newspaper Collection (https://goo.gl/OZ7GgR)
“Sugar bowls, catsup bottles, vinegar cruets, mustard pots, pork and beans, odds and ends of uneaten pie, went flying through the air at Escher’s State street restaurant night before last, while the after-midnight diners ducked their heads under the tables to escape the cyclone of dishes and food. Continue reading “Reel News: Yesterday’s News Today—“Cyclone in a Restaurant””

National Landscape Architecture Month and Denver’s Public Spaces

National Landscape Architecture Month
Denver’s 6th Avenue Parkway

April is National Landscape Architecture Month

National Landscape Architecture Month is an opportunity to celebrate and learn about many of the historic resources in the National Register of Historic Places and the Colorado State Register of Historic Properties. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America’s historic and archaeological resources, and is the official list of the Nation’s historic places worthy of preservation. The Colorado State Register of Historic Properties is a listing of the state’s significant cultural resources worthy of preservation for the future education and enjoyment of Colorado’s residents and visitors. Continue reading “National Landscape Architecture Month and Denver’s Public Spaces”

Azalia Smith Hackley—Musical Prodigy and Pioneering Journalist

Azalia Smith Hackley, The Broad Ax [Salt Lake City, UT], Chronicling America, http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024055/1910-11-12/ed-1/seq-1/
Azalia Smith Hackley, The Broad Ax Salt Lake City, UT, Chronicling America.
In honor of Women’s History Month, we’re highlighting Emma Azalia Smith Hackley, a former resident of Denver and co-editor of the newspaper the Statesman. The Statesman, which later became The Denver Star, will be the first of 18 titles History Colorado is digitizing to add to the Library of Congress Chronicling America database. If you’d like to learn more about History Colorado’s participation in the National Digital Newspaper Program, please follow this link. Continue reading “Azalia Smith Hackley—Musical Prodigy and Pioneering Journalist”