A black and white photo of a large building with geometric features. Its exterior is dominated by pillars and its peaked roof is higher than the trees around it. There is a dirt driveway leading up to the building where a car is parked.

Upcoming Exhibition

You Should've Seen It: Pueblo's Mineral Palace

You Should’ve Seen It: Pueblo’s Mineral Palace follows the strange and little-known history of the Colorado Mineral Palace, which for 51 years stood as an icon of the industry and hope of the state of Colorado and city of Pueblo. Since its demolition, it has since drifted into urban legend and folklore, leaving generations of Puebloans wondering what it was, where it went, and what (if anything) remains.

A performance in the Mineral Palace Bandshell, likely by the city's municipal band. People are seated on benches across the water, watching.
Three young Indigenous women in traditional dress at the Pueblo multicultural festival.
A view of Mineral Palace Park showing flower beds, trees, and the huge Mineral Palace rising over it all.
Individuals examining the minerals in the display cases at the Mineral Palace.
The interior of the Mineral Palace, showing the size of the huge hall and the domes overhead. King Coal and the Silver Queen are on display flanking the stage.
A celebration being held inside the Mineral Palace. A large crowd fills the open atrium between the pillars. Near the center of the crowd are individuals dressed as Uncle Sam, Columbia, and Lady Liberty.
A black and white photo of a large building with geometric features. Its exterior is dominated by pillars and its peaked roof is higher than the trees around it. There is a dirt driveway leading up to the building where a car is parked.

Is there any doubt that the Colorado Mineral Palace will be the eighth wonder of the world?

Pueblo Chieftain, 1889.