Spanish Colonial Revival

Color photograph of Saint Thomas Episcopal Church in Denver.

The Spanish Colonial Revival style is depicted in this photograph of the east facade of the St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Denver.

Spanish Colonial Revival, popular during the 1920s and 1930s, is characterized by elaborately carved decorations surrounding windows, entrances and cornices.  In contrast to the plainer, flat surfaces of the Mission and Mediterranean styles, the Spanish Colonial Revival building exhibits more complex, deeply sculptured surfaces.  Curvilinear gables and parapets, arcaded entrances and porches, wrought iron detailing around openings, round arched or straight-headed windows, and heavy tile roofs are also characteristic elements of this style.  Stucco is the most common exterior finish and is generally painted white or a light color.  Spanish Colonial is a more decorative style than either the Mission or Mediterranean styles.

Color photograph of St. Patrick's Mission Church in northwest Denver.

The St. Patrick's Mission Church in northwest Denver is an example of the Spanish Colonial Revival style.

Black and white photograph of a Spanish Colonial Revival style house.

An example of the Spanish Colonial Revival Style in Denver.

Common elements:

  1. curvilinear gable
  2. heavy tile roof
  3. arcaded entrance or porch
  4. wrought iron grillwork
  5. ornately carved details
  6. round arched windows
  7. straight-headed windows
  8. bell tower
  9. stucco/plaster finish